Box Vents, Ridge Vents, Soffit Vents

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Box Vents, Ridge Vents, Soffit Vents



At Comprehensive Mold Management, we are frequently asked about attic ventilation and the differences between the three types of vents. Each type of vent has a different, useful purpose, and can significantly help with attic ventilation when installed properly. Below are descriptions and pictures of the three vents used (box vents, ridge vents and soffit vents).


Box Vents:
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Vents on the pitch of a roof that come out horizontally from the attic.


Ridge Vents:
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A ridge vent is a type of vent installed at the peak of a sloped roof which allows warm, humid air to escape a building's attic.

Soffit Vents:
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An intake ventilation device located in the soffit. An exhaust vent should be installed on or near the ridge of the roof to work in conjunction with the soffit vent in order to properly ventilate the attic space.

If you are unsure if your attic is vented properly, call a professional to have your attic ventilation inspected. A properly insulated and ventilated attic can save a homeowner money on energy bills, potential attic moisture issues, attic mold, and many other ventilation problems. The sooner your attic is inspected, the less money you may have to end up spending down the road. At Comprehensive Mold Management, we offer ventilation and insulation services along with our main line of work (mold removal). Give us a call as soon as possible at 585-235-6182 if you question your attic’s ventilation or insulation. Have any additional questions? Email us at info@compmold.com.

Visit Comprehensive Mold Management's website for more information at www.compmold.com

How To Clean Mold From Clothing

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How To Clean Mold From Clothing

Mold on your clothing needs to be removed and treated properly. Mold is not good whether it be inside your home or on personal belongings. Comprehensive Mold Management recommends the following to treat clothing (Non-Dry Cleaning):

Items Required:
·         2 Cups of 20 Mule Team Borax
·         4 Gallons of Water
·         Tub (Bathtub/Sink or Container to soak)

Steps:
  1. Mix together the borax and water. Let dissolve fully.
  2. Place the clothing in the solution and make sure that it is fully saturated.
  3. Allow for the clothing to soak for 30 minutes.
  4. Launder your clothing as normal.

Tips:
·         If stains remain on your clothing, then you can use Chlorine (Whites) Non-Chlorine Bleach (Colors) (DO NOT use bleach to remove mold from your home). If the staining still remains after using bleach, then you will need to throw away that piece of clothing.
·         Dry Cleaning – Clothing that is dry clean only should be taken to your local dry cleaner, as they have processes to take care of the mold.

Clothing and smaller items/areas can be treated by the owner. However, if mold is growing inside of your home, be sure to contact a professional. 

Visit Comprehensive Mold Management's website for more information at www.compmold.com

Summer Mold Growth

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Summer Mold Growth

During the summer, mold growth is caused by different reasons than during the winter. In the winter, mold tends to grow in cold, uninsulated exterior windows and walls, while the heat is running. Common places where this occurs is exterior walls and uninsulated closets, where building surfaces are generally cold relative to the indoor air temperature.
Temperature also affects mold growth. Different types of mold have minimum, optimum and maximum temperature ranges for growth. Most mildew thrives at temperatures between 77 and 86 degrees F, therefore summer conditions will encourage mildew growth. Air conditioning will reduce the interior temperatures of homes; however, these temperatures may not be consistently low enough to stop mildew growth if the air is fairly humid. It may be warmer in areas within cabinets and closets or behind draperies. Humidity will be trapped unless the doors are left ajar for improved ventilation. In addition, warm air can hold more moisture than cool air. For example, air at 80 degrees F can hold twice as much moisture as air at 60 degrees F. If air in a house was 60 degrees F and saturated with moisture (100 percent RH), and then was heated to 80 degrees F without a change in moisture, the RH would be about 50 percent.
Make sure to check your home for mold growth throughout the summer months. If you find mold growth or are concerned about an area in your home, make sure to call a professional to come out and evaluate it for you. 

Visit Comprehensive Mold Management's website for more information at www.compmold.com

5 Question Checklist for Mold Growth in Your Home

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5 Question Checklist for Mold Growth in Your Home


There are several indicators throughout homes, which can alert homeowners that they may have a potential mold problem. Here are 5 questions to ask yourself, to check to see if mold may be growing in your home:

1.   Do you have condensation on your windows?
Check for condensation on your windows, this indicates that you have a moisture issue inside of your home.

2.   Does your home have a musty or damp smell?
Take a walk through your home to see if you notice a musty or damp smell, particularly in the basement. This tends to be a strong indicator that mold may be present in your home.

3.   During the winter months, do you have ice damming around your soffits or gutters?
Ice damming and icicles are an indicator that you have poor ventilation in your home which can lead to mold growth.

4.   Do you see any dark discoloration around your ceiling lines or corners of your home?
      Discoloration or spotting is a strong sign that you have mold growth.

5.   Is there standing water in your basement?
If you have standing water in your basement for more than 24-48 hours, it can lead to mold growth. 

If you notice any of these signs in your home, you should contact a professional. Sometimes mold is not visible and can be behind walls or in other areas that cannot be seen. If you are concerned you may have mold in your home please give Comprehensive Mold Management today at 585.235.6182. 

Visit Comprehensive Mold Management's website for more information at www.compmold.com

Why You Don’t Always Want the Cheapest Estimate

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Why You Don’t Always Want the Cheapest Estimate



At Comprehensive Mold Management, we regularly have people tell us they’re shopping around for the cheapest estimate that they can be quoted. We’re here to let you know that the cheapest estimate isn’t always the right estimate. Here’s why:


-Your home is your investment. Chances are, when you choose the cheapest estimate or the “best offer”, you may be getting a lower quality of work. As the saying goes, “You get what you paid for.” Checking online reviews on Angie’s List, the BBB, and talking to previous customers are great places to start.


-Some mold removal companies only take care of the mold. The quote may be cheaper upfront, but if the moisture issue isn’t resolved, you may face a more severe problem down the road.Comprehensive Mold Management does all of the work start to finish. We take care of the moisture issue, remove the mold, and complete any other necessary work that is required.


-Typically, cheaper quotes do not include a warranty. Our work may not be the cheapest, but we do the work correctly. We follow industry standard protocol, so any work we complete is covered with a lifetime warranty*. If you sell you home, our work is covered with a five year transferrable warranty*.


-Other companies may not follow the proper standards or protocol, having a need for less materials. Comprehensive Mold Management is fully ensured, and CMM always uses the best materials available. We use the highest quality materials available to insure the job is done correctly.


We understand no one really plans for a mold problem to occur in their home. Nonetheless, we recommend doing your research. When taking care of a mold problem, it should be taken care of the right way the first time. The longer you wait to take care of the problem, the more damage you will face down the road, and the repairs will be more expensive to fix properly. As a homeowner, you should feel comfortable letting the mold removal company you choose into your home, and know you will be in good hands.

*Some restrictions may apply

Visit Comprehensive Mold Management's website for more information
at www.compmold.com

Roof Repair Tips

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Roof Repair Tips

Early detection of roof leaks is the key to avoiding serious roof damage, but finding the problem is sometimes the most difficult aspect of roof repair. Certainly, it’s the first step and to prevent costly problems down the road, it’s task you have got to take seriously. At the very least, if you want the leak to go away, you must determine its underlying cause. Check for any missing, curled, or cracked shingles (leaks also occur where shingles butt together). Additionally, inspect for any failures in the roof flashing, caulking, or the end caps (those tent-shaped shingles that cover roof peaks).

Asphalt shingles are the most popular roofing material for homes today, accounting for nearly 70% of domestic roofing installations, according to Tom Bollnow, senior director of technical services at the National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA). And for good reason—asphalt shingles are lightweight, durable, attractive, and priced well compared to competitive roofing materials.
While most asphalt shingles are manufactured with the latest advancements in weather- and wind-resistance, fire safety, and long-lasting performance, even the best of them can develop problems over time. The good news is that an asphalt shingle roof is probably the easiest type to repair, since curled shingles can be flattened and re-secured, and old shingles can simply be replaced. Plus, asphalt shingles make the warning signs of a serious roofing problem readily perceptible.


Related: Should You Replace or Repair Your Roof?

If you discover that your roof is leaking—most likely evident by water stains on the ceiling—note the leak’s location.  Look to see if there are any curled, cracked, or missing shingles.  Leaks can occur at any point where shingles butt, or where caulking and flashing have been compromised.  End caps, the tent-shaped shingles that cover the angular peaks of the roof, can also be the source of leaks, so check those as well.
If you discover shingle problems (which you can do from the ground with a good pair of binoculars), repairs may be an easy fix.  Curled-back shingles, for example, can be re-secured by brushing on a coating of asphalt roofing cement or finding its equivalent compound in tubes for use with a caulk gun.  You’ll want to apply a generous amount of roofing cement to the underside of the shingle to make certain that the edge and corners are secured.  Then press firmly to set.  Note: Shingles will be more pliable in warm weather than when it’s cold, so consider that factor when resolving problems.

Photo: How Stuff Works
If shingles are cracked, missing or rotten, replacing them may be another simple fix (provided you have the replacement shingles). To remove a damaged shingle, lift the edges of the surrounding shingles and carefully remove nails with a pry bar. Once the nails are removed, the shingle should slide out.  Scrape away any of the residue cement from the roof and level or remove protruding nails.
Before you attempt to replace a new shingle, round the back corners with a utility knife. This will make it easier for you to slide the shingle under the one above and align it with those on either side. Once you have it in position, lift the corners of the overlapping shingles and fasten the top of the new replacement with 6d galvanized roofing nails. Be sure to secure with nails in each corner. Last, cover the nail heads with roof cement and smooth down the overlapping shingle edges.
To repair leaks caused by metal flashing around chimneys and dormers, simply reseal joints with a caulk gun of roofing cement. If you see damage to joints previously sealed with a line of roof cement, apply a fresh new coat with a putty knife.
If you are replacing a row of shingles, or if you find that shingles lift from the roof easily, it may be time to call in a professional roofer to inspect the situation. Spot repairs will not extend the life of a roof in need of replacement.

Source: By Larry Bilotti. Leaky Roof? Some Repair Tips. http://www.bobvila.com/articles/roof-leaking-repair/#.U44gbfldW9E

Visit Comprehensive Mold Management's website for more information at www.compmold.com