Summer Mold Growth

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Summer Mold Growth

During the summer, mold growth is caused by different reasons than during the winter. In the winter, mold tends to grow in cold, uninsulated exterior windows and walls, while the heat is running. Common places where this occurs is exterior walls and uninsulated closets, where building surfaces are generally cold relative to the indoor air temperature.
Temperature also affects mold growth. Different types of mold have minimum, optimum and maximum temperature ranges for growth. Most mildew thrives at temperatures between 77 and 86 degrees F, therefore summer conditions will encourage mildew growth. Air conditioning will reduce the interior temperatures of homes; however, these temperatures may not be consistently low enough to stop mildew growth if the air is fairly humid. It may be warmer in areas within cabinets and closets or behind draperies. Humidity will be trapped unless the doors are left ajar for improved ventilation. In addition, warm air can hold more moisture than cool air. For example, air at 80 degrees F can hold twice as much moisture as air at 60 degrees F. If air in a house was 60 degrees F and saturated with moisture (100 percent RH), and then was heated to 80 degrees F without a change in moisture, the RH would be about 50 percent.
Make sure to check your home for mold growth throughout the summer months. If you find mold growth or are concerned about an area in your home, make sure to call a professional to come out and evaluate it for you. 

Visit Comprehensive Mold Management's website for more information at www.compmold.com